Illegal Jesus

Those Who Ignore History Are Doomed to Repeat It…

Posted in human rights, personal, religion, the personal is political, women's rights by indiegoddess on January 8, 2009

“As the day progressed, the hall slowly filled with rowdies, and each speaker was interrupted by catcalls and jibes. Lucretia kept order with apparent self-possession, although within her her stomach knotted and spat.

She was not surprised by the heckling. Yesterday she had warned her sister delegates to expect nothing but increase [sic] hostility now that it was at last perceived that woman was demanding nothing less than full equality. ‘Any great change must expect opposition, because it shakes the very foundation of privilege,’ she reminded them.”

-Margaret Hope Bacon, Valient Friend: The Life of Lucretia Mott

Because my conscience, and the light I see inside myself and others, says that it is right, I will keep fighting until all are equal. Until every holder of unwarranted privilege shakes in their boots at my voice, I will continue to speak out, continue to refuse to be silenced. Because it is the right thing to do.

The queer and straight; women and men; trans and cis-gendered; black, red, brown, and yellow, white and everything in between; children, teenagers and the elderly; abled, and disabled; fat, and thin; jewish, agnostic, pan-theistic, wiccan, athiest, secular humanist, christian, and muslim; poor, rich; strong, weak, broken and complete must be made equal. Because. It. Is. The. Right. Thing. To. Do.

And to the cat-callers: come. And to the advocates: let them come. They come because they recognize that we are serious. They recognize that we will accept, now, nothing less than full humanity for all. For each and every one of us. And that we will fight. And that we will not rest, save for in the arms of the final sleep of death. WE WILL BE EQUAL. WE WILL BE FREE.

Let them come.

I Want to Be in the Light…

Posted in personal, religion by indiegoddess on December 21, 2008

Well, your prayers were answered, loves. This morning at meeting a friend’s words really spoke to my condition. She talked about how today is the shortest day of the year, the day with the least light… there was more, and that more definitely hit where I was coming from, but the crux of the matter was this: even when it seems the darkest, there is still light to be found. In our communities and families, and even in the country.

I find it wonderful that tonight, the longest night of the year, is also the first day of Chanukah. Now, I’m going to guess that most of you know what Chanukah is a celebration of – that the oil the kept the lights burning kept going long beyond when it should have gone out.

There is always light. In each other, when we look – in our enemies, when we pray to surround them with it; it touches a spark in each and every one of us, one that today I have been convinced never goes out.

No matter how hurt, angry, broken, or destructive we are. No matter how many we hurt or anger or destroy, that light can never be fully extinguished. We may need to look outside for the spark which will bring it back to glow in ourselves, but it is never not there. This morning, a friend spoke to my condition. I had felt alone and light-less. It’s easy to do when the skies are grey and the days are short.

But remember that the light will last long beyond when you think it should be gone. And the light that shines in each person you know should be a celebration not unlike Chanukah – a festival of lights, a conglomeration that, when brought together in your mind, will set you on fire and remind you that there is a light that never goes out. It’s the light of our humanity. The light of our goodness. The light of God, if you will, shining in each and every one of us, reminding those of us who so easily forget – like myself – that when you wake in the morning, the candle will still be burning. Tomorrow and the next day and the next and the next, until miraculously eight days have passed, and the light is still burning, and you remember that it burns inside of you, as well.

Happy (almost) Chanukah, and happy longest night of the year. Remember that it’s just when it seems darkest that the sparest light has the most opportunity to bring us back to what we know, what we need, and what we will always have: that of God within.

Be well.

Willing to Fight

Posted in christianity, human rights, personal, political, religion, the personal is political, women's rights by indiegoddess on December 19, 2008

What does it really mean to be a leftist in the early part of the 21st century? What are we really talking about? And I can just be very candid with you, it means To have a certain kind of temperament, to make certain kinds of political and ethical choices, and to exercise certain kinds of analytical focuses, targeting on the catastrophic and the monstrous, the scandalous, the traumatic, that are often hidden and concealed in the deoderised, manicured discourses of the mainstream, that’s what it means to be a leftist, so let’s just be clear about it. So if you’re concerned about structural violence, if you’re concerned about exploitation at the workplace, if you’re concerned about institutionalised contempt against gay brothers and lesbian sisters, if you’re concerned about organised hatred against peoples of colour, if you’re concerned about a subordination of women: that’s not cheap PC chit-chat. That is a calling: that you’re willing to fight against and try to understand the sources of that social misery. At the structural and institutional level and at the existential and the personal level. That’s what it means in part to be a leftist. That’s why we choose to be certain kinds of human beings. That’s why it’s a calling, not a career. It’s a vocation, not a profession. That’s why you see these veterans still here year after year after year because they are convinced, they don’t want to live in a world and they don’t want to be human in such a way that they don’t exercise their intellectual and political and social and cultural resources in such a way to leave the world just a little better than it was when they entered. That’s in part what it means to be a leftist. – Cornel West, 2007

Finding the Light

Posted in personal, religion by indiegoddess on December 19, 2008

I’m having a rough time today finding the light.

The last few days have been hectic. They usually are around this time of year. There’s no time for resting, which is something that I need very badly. Even when I spend the day in bed, it still feels like every moment is lived in anticipation of the next. Instead of reading the books I’ve checked out from the library, I’m throat-deep in political news, as usual, and the commentary about it. All of it spins around me until everything feels dark and closed in, and I close my eyes and try to find the light to hold others in, let alone myself, and cheese-and-rice, there’s nothing there. Not even a spark.

Yesterday it was the Jon Favreau issue. Today it’s Rick Warren and anti-semitism. All of these things are issues that need to be dealt with and thought about and the truth needs to be spoken. I’m a little disheartened that there seems to be such a lack of truly progressive voices in my small sphere – no, I’m a lot disheartened. I’m a lot disheartened and de-lighted that so few people are speaking out against such a cacophony of irritation at that speaking out. I decided that I was going to break away from the noise of that irritation – that I was going to look up people that inspire me and listen to them, return some of the books I have to the library and check out some that will bring that spark back when I close my eyes.

So I deleted the results of the conversations in which I was being so attacked, ignored the new ones as they came in; donated my monthly $5.00 to Shakesville, a place where people much more intelligent than me dwell and speak out and bring things to my attention that I am too cocooned to necessarily notice; downloaded some more videos of Cornel West on Democracy Now and scrolled through some old entries at one of the Quaker blogs that I read. This afternoon I’m going to go check out Race Matters, if it’s still there, and make myself a string of prayer beads and close my eyes and see if I can find the light again. Pray for me.

Sit down, shut up, and do as you’re told

Posted in christianity, human rights, religion by writerwriting on December 15, 2008

Blessings be upon thee, Christian women. The answer to your prayers are here.

A group of conservative Christian women is seeking 100,000 signatures on a “True Woman Manifesto” aimed at sparking a counter-revolution to the feminist movement of the 1960s.

Introduced at a gathering of more than 6,000 women in early October, the document calls not for equal rights, but instead proclaims that men and women are created to reflect God’s image in “complementary and distinct ways.”

That includes the idea that women are called “to honor and support God-ordained male leadership in the home and in the church.”

Source.